Posted 2 days ago

0nechoice:

THANK YOU, JENNI HERD

Posted 2 days ago
Don’t compare your Chapter 1 to someone else’s Chapter 20.
Posted 2 days ago

hiddleshabanera:

dragoniza:

”- Why don’t you smile? 

-Because I have an ugly smile.

-That’s impossible, when someone smiles, no matter what form have smile, or if your teeth are large, small, crooked… People just look beautiful when they smile, because we know that they are happy, and that’s what matters.”

teeth / smiles appreciation Animation

YOU FORGOT ONE 

image

Posted 2 days ago
She lives the poetry she cannot write.
Oscar Wilde  (via ma-demoiselle-cherie)

(Source: sunst0ne)

Posted 4 days ago
Posted 4 days ago
Posted 5 days ago
Posted 6 days ago
My grandfather always said that living is like licking honey off a thorn.
Louis Adamic  (via weaverofstars)

(Source: wordpainting)

Posted 1 week ago

andrysb24:

joannaestep:

An interview with Tom Hiddleston

IT ALL MAKES SENSE NOW.

It’s like a superhero origin story

(Source: benedicttumbl-rbatch)

Posted 1 week ago
Posted 1 week ago
guiselore:

lesbianathogwarts:

bashdoard:

fuckyeah-bill:

Promoing at the beach

Ancient Roman prostitutes did something similar, but usually they would have phalluses inscribed in their sandals. So, if you were ever in the mood, you could just look down and follow the dicks.

follow the yellow dick-road

I love history lessons on tumblr.

guiselore:

lesbianathogwarts:

bashdoard:

fuckyeah-bill:

Promoing at the beach

Ancient Roman prostitutes did something similar, but usually they would have phalluses inscribed in their sandals. So, if you were ever in the mood, you could just look down and follow the dicks.

follow the yellow dick-road

I love history lessons on tumblr.

(Source: sve-sto-imam-nemamm)

Posted 1 week ago

cutiewill:

lumos5000:

EVERYONE CAN GO HOME NOW. THIS ONE WINS. 

we’re already home

(Source: gingerwhovianrobotskeleton)

Posted 1 week ago
Posted 1 week ago

brockdavis:

popcorn rain cloud #popcorn #rain #popcornraincloud

Posted 1 week ago
explore-blog:

Rachel Sussman’s photographs of the oldest living things in the world – a masterpiece at the intersection of art, science, and philosophy.

With an artist’s gift for “aesthetic force” and a scientist’s rigorous respect for truth, Sussman straddles a multitude of worlds as she travels across space and time to unearth Earth’s greatest stories of resilience, stories of tragedy and triumph, past and future, but above all stories that humble our human lives, which seem like the blink of a cosmic eye against the timescales of these ancient organisms — organisms that have unflinchingly witnessed all of our own tragedies and triumphs, our wars and our revolutions, our holocausts and our renaissances, and have remained anchored to existence more firmly than we can ever hope to be.
Above all, however, the project raises questions that aren’t so much scientific or artistic as profoundly human: What is the meaning of human life if it comes and goes before a patch of moss has reached the end of infancy? How do our petty daily stresses measure up against a struggle for survival stretching back millennia? Who would we be if we relinquished our arrogant conviction that we are Earth’s biological crown jewel?

See more here.

explore-blog:

Rachel Sussman’s photographs of the oldest living things in the world – a masterpiece at the intersection of art, science, and philosophy.

With an artist’s gift for “aesthetic force” and a scientist’s rigorous respect for truth, Sussman straddles a multitude of worlds as she travels across space and time to unearth Earth’s greatest stories of resilience, stories of tragedy and triumph, past and future, but above all stories that humble our human lives, which seem like the blink of a cosmic eye against the timescales of these ancient organisms — organisms that have unflinchingly witnessed all of our own tragedies and triumphs, our wars and our revolutions, our holocausts and our renaissances, and have remained anchored to existence more firmly than we can ever hope to be.

Above all, however, the project raises questions that aren’t so much scientific or artistic as profoundly human: What is the meaning of human life if it comes and goes before a patch of moss has reached the end of infancy? How do our petty daily stresses measure up against a struggle for survival stretching back millennia? Who would we be if we relinquished our arrogant conviction that we are Earth’s biological crown jewel?

See more here.